Blood and Transplant Donation

Become a Blood and Transplant donor now!

Yesterday saw our Managing Director at RTC Medical Solutions become the latest person to join the Blood and Transplant donor register.  Following a meeting with James he states that “In my personal opinion, becoming a donor should be compulsory as Blood and Organ donations are desperately needed every day across the UK.

 

Blood and Transplant Donation

 

 

 

 

 

If you want to be a superhero and save someones life simply click in the image above and sign up today.

 

Event Medical Services – Drug Awareness

Event Medical Services – Drug Awareness

Event Medical Services – Drug Awareness is commited to ensuring a safe drug free environment at all events we cover.  We always aim to ensure we give the most up to date and relevant information.

Event Medical Services - Drug Awareness

Event Medical Services – Drug Awareness and the effects of MDMA

Acute Effects

A person may experience the intoxicating effects of MDMA between 20 and 60 after taking a single dose. Those effects include an enhanced sense of well-being, increased extroversion,27,53 emotional warmth, empathy toward others,54 and a willingness to discuss emotionally-charged memories.55 In addition, people report enhanced sensory perception as a hallmark of the MDMA experience.27,28

Use of even moderate doses of MDMA in crowded, warm environments—or during periods of vigorous, extended physical activity—can dramatically increase body temperature, with potential deadly consequences.

However, MDMA can also cause a number of acute adverse health effects. For example, while fatal overdoses on MDMA are rare, they can potentially be life threatening—with symptoms including high blood pressure (hypertension), faintness,8,56 panic attacks,57 and in severe cases, a loss of consciousness and seizures.58

Because of its stimulant properties and the situations in which it is often taken, MDMA is associated with vigorous physical activity for extended periods in warm environments. This can lead to one of the most significant, although rare, acute adverse effects—a marked rise in body temperature (hyperthermia).59–61 Research in rats shows that even moderate doses of MDMA interfere with the body’s ability to regulate temperature, potentially leading to deadly consequences in warm environments.6 Treatment of hyperthermia requires prompt medical attention, as it can rapidly lead to muscle breakdown or an electrolyte (sodium) imbalance, which can in turn produce kidney failure9 or fatal swelling of the brain, especially in women.62 MDMA use in combination with vigorous exercise causes dehydration,56,57 leading some people to drink large amounts of liquids. However, this could increase the risk of electrolyte imbalance or brain swelling because MDMA causes the body to retain water.63,64 One modest dose of MDMA can also reduce the pumping efficiency of the heart in people who use regularly,65 which is of particular concern during periods of increased physical activity.

MDMA can also produce other adverse health effects, including involuntary jaw clenching,53 lack of appetite,28,53mild detachment from oneself (depersonalization), illogical or disorganized thoughts, restless legs,28 nausea,56,57,66hot flashes or chills,8,56 headache, sweating,8,57 and muscle or joint stiffness.66

In the hours after taking the drug, MDMA produces significant reductions in perceiving and predicting motion—for example, the ability to judge whether a driver is in danger of colliding with another car. This emphasizes the potential dangers of performing complex or skilled activities, such as driving a car, while under the influence of this drug.67

Once MDMA is metabolized, or broken down in the body, its byproducts interfere with the body’s ability to metabolize MDMA.68 As a result, additional doses of MDMA can produce unexpectedly high blood levels, which could worsen the toxic effects of this drug.69 In addition, combining MDMA with other substances, such as caffeine,70amphetamines,71 the amphetamine-like mephedrone,72marijuana,73 or alcohol,74,75 may increase the risk of adverse health effects associated with MDMA.29

Sub-acute Effects

Recreational use of MDMA is often characterized by repeated drug taking over a number of days (binges), followed by periods of no drug taking. In one animal study, this pattern of use produced irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) and heart damage.76 In the week following use of the drug, many people report depression, impaired attention and memory,77–79 anxiety, aggression,80 and irritability.78

Effects of Regular MDMA Use

Sleep disturbances, lack of appetite, concentration difficulties, depression,79 heart disease,81,82 and impulsivity83 have been associated with regular use of MDMA. In addition, heavy MDMA use over a 2-year period of time is associated with decreased cognitive function.84Some of these disturbances may not be directly attributable to MDMA, but may be related to some of the other drugs often used in combination with MDMA, such as cocaine, alcohol, or marijuana, or to adulterants commonly found in MDMA tablets. More research is needed to understand the specific effects of regular MDMA use.

For more information on Event Medical Services – Drug Awareness and  Drug Addiction click here

National Institute for Drug Abuse

Event Medical Services – Heat Exhaustion

Event Medical Services – Heat Exhaustion

Event Medical Services - Heat Exhaustion

Event Medical Services – Heat Exhaustion

With the hot weather gripping the Nation, our advice on Event Medical Services – Heat Exhaustion will help you avoid Heat Exhaustion allowing you to make the most of this amazing weather.

Heat exhaustion is not serious and usually gets better when you cool down. If it turns into heat stroke it needs to be treated as an emergency.

Check for signs of heat exhaustion

The signs of heat exhaustion include:

  • headache
  • dizziness and confusion
  • loss of appetite and feeling sick
  • excessive sweating and pale, clammy skin
  • cramps in the arms, legs and stomach
  • fast breathing or pulse
  • temperature of 38C or above
  • intense thirst

The symptoms are often the same in adults and children, although children may become floppy and sleepy.

If someone is showing signs of heat exhaustion they need to be cooled down.

Things you can do to cool someone down

Follow these 4 steps:

  1. Move them to a cool place.
  2. Get them to lie down and raise their feet slightly.
  3. Get them to drink plenty of water. Sports or rehydration drinks are OK.
  4. Cool their skin – spray or sponge them with cool water and fan them. Cold packs around the armpits or neck are good too.

Stay with them until they are better.

They should start to cool down and feel better within 30 minutes.

Call 999 if the person:

  • is no better after 30 minutes
  • feels hot and dry
  • is not sweating even though they are too hot
  • has a temperature that’s risen to 40C or above
  • has rapid or shortness of breath
  • is confused
  • has a fit (seizure)
  • loses consciousness
  • is unresponsive

These can be signs of heat stroke.

While you wait for help, keep giving first aid and put them in the recovery position if they lose consciousness.

Preventing heat exhaustion and heat stroke

There is a high risk of heat exhaustion or heat stroke during hot weather or exercise.

To help prevent heat exhaustion or heat stroke:

  • drink plenty of cold drinks, especially when exercising
  • take cool baths or showers
  • wear light-coloured, loose clothing
  • sprinkle water over skin or clothes
  • avoid the sun between 11am and 3pm
  • avoid excess alcohol
  • avoid extreme exercise

This will also prevent dehydration and help your body keep itself cool.

The Event Paramedic’s Advice On Sun Safety

Event Paramedic’s Advice On Sun Safety

Event Paramedic's Advice On Sun Safety

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By following our Event Paramedic‘s advice on sun safety you can enjoy you time in the sun and keep yourself safe from the suns harmful rays.

However old you are, you should always protect your skin from sunburn by using a combination of sun cream, shade and clothing.  Although children and teenager require reminding from time to time, it is essential that they are reminded to keep protected.

So what is our Event Paramedic’s Advice On Sun Safety:

  • Use Sun Cream
  • Cover up
  • Make use of the shade

Sun Cream

Sunscreens will not protect us completely from sun damage on their own. However, they can be useful for protecting the parts of skin we can’t shade or cover. This is why we recommend using sunscreens together with shade or clothing to avoid getting too much UV exposure.

We recommend buying sunscreens with a:

  • Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 15 (UVB protection)
  • High star rating with at least 4 stars (UVA protection)

UVA protection can also be indicated by the letters ‘UVA’ in a circle which indicates that it meets the EU standard.

Worryingly, research suggests people who use sunscreen to deliberately sunbathe are more likely to spend longer in the sun, and might even be more likely to get sunburnt.  And there is a concern that higher factor sunscreens may lure people into a false sense of security.

You should never use sunscreen in order to spend longer in the sun. No sunscreen, no matter how high the factor, can provide 100% protection.

Tips for using sunscreen properly

No sunscreen will give the protection it claims unless you apply it properly.

  • Make sure you put enough sunscreen on – people often apply much less than they need to. When your risk of burning is high, ensure that all exposed skin is thoroughly covered in sunscreen. As a guide for an adult this means: Around 2 teaspoonfuls of sunscreen if you’re just covering your head, arms and neck. Around 2 and a half tablespoonfuls if you’re covering your entire body, for example while wearing a swimming costume
  • Reapply sunscreen regularly including ‘once a day’ and ‘water resistant’ products. Some products are designed to stay on better than others, but beware of sunscreen rubbing, sweating or washing off. It’s especially important to reapply after towelling dry. And reapplying helps avoid missing bits of skin.
  • Use sunscreen together with shade and clothing to avoiding getting caught out by sunburn.
  • Don’t be tempted to spend longer in the sun than you would without sunscreen.
  • Don’t store sunscreens in very hot places as extreme heat can ruin their protective chemicals.
  • Don’t forget to check the expiry date on your sunscreen. Most sunscreens have a shelf life of 2-3 years, shown on the label by a symbol of a pot with the letter M and a number – this is the number of months the sunscreen will last once it’s been opened. Check your sunscreen has not expired before you use it.

 

Cover Up

Along with shade, another way to protect your skin from the sun is with clothing, a wide-brimmed hat and good quality sunglasses.

Clothes

The more skin that’s covered by your clothing, the better the protection you’re getting. Choose clothing that’s loose-fitting and deeper in colour. Also look for materials with a close weave- as a guide hold the material up to check you can’t see through the fabric. Clothing that’s dry also provides more protection than if it’s wet. This is particularly the case for cotton clothes.

Hats

Hats are great for protecting the whole face and head. Choose a wide-brimmed hat for the most protection. A ‘legionnaire’ style hat that has flaps around the ears and back of the neck also offers good protection.

Sunglasses

When choosing sunglasses look for one of the following:

  • ‘CE Mark’ and British Standard
  • UV 400 label
  • 100% UV protection written on the label or sticker

Also, make sure that the glasses offer protection at the side of the eye, for example, choose wraparound styles.

 

Make Use of the Shade

One of the best ways to protect your skin from the harmful effects of the sun’s UV rays is to spend some time in the shade.

You can find or create shade in many different ways. For example:

  • Trees and foliage
  • Umbrellas and parasols
  • Canopies and awnings
  • Tents and shelter
  • Going indoors

Spending time in the shade is a great way to protect your skin when the sun is strong. But UV rays can go through some fabrics and reflect off the ground so it’s still important to think about clothing and sunscreen.

Trust the Event Paramedic’s advice on sun safety

Click here for more information on the risk of sun damage

 

Gloworm Festival Event Medical Services

Gloworm Festival

Gloworm Festival Event Medical Services

Gloworm Festival Event Medical Services

Yes Boys and Girls, it’s back and RTC Medical Solutions are providing the Gloworm Festival Event Medical Services!

Gloworm returns to the East Midlands bigger and better than ever…

This year Gloworm festival is home to tribute acts such as Queen, Amy Winehouse, Little Mix and Daft Punk and much more entertainment.  Why not bring the kiddies to meet Dr Ranj, Timmy Mallet and not forgetting Peppa Pig!!!

We of course will be ensuring that you all receive the best medical care available with our very own on site Treatment Centre & Ambulance Service for Gloworm Festival Event Medical Services

So if you’re just looking to come down for the day or planning on camping over, book your tickets now to avoid disappointment.  Visit the Gloworm site for more information.

Jaguar Vector smash it…

Jaguar Vector Racing Break Maritime Electric World Record


Jaguar Vector Racing Break Maritime Electric World Record

What a day this was and we have waited so long for the announcement. It was an absolute pleasure to be chosen as the medical provider for the Jaguar Vector Maritime Electric World Record attempt back in May 2018.  Following an amazing 4 days at Coniston Water, Peter Dredge managed to push this awesome machine to 88.61mph. It’s just a shame he didn’t have a flux capacitor on board!

We’d like to congratulate Peter for the Jaguar Vector Racing Break Maritime Electric World Record attempt from the whole team at RTC Medical Solutions, well done!

To see the full video of the attempt, please Click Here

Jaguar Vector Racing Break Maritime Electric World Record

Event Medical Treatment Centre

Our Event Medical Treatment Centre is back after a complete overhaul and finally good to go again.

  • Interior LED lighting
  • Exterior LED Scene lighting
  • Completely self contained
  • Hot running water
  • Heating
  • Fully Advanced Life Support capable
  • Minors and Majors treatment areas
  • Disabled access
Event Medical Treatment Centre

Event Medical Treatment Centre

We’re very lucky to have this amazing treatment centre and you could also have it at your event too. Contact us now for booking information.

Click here to contact us now for more information

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CQC Registered Ambulance Services

CQC Registered Ambulance Services

CQC Registered Ambulance Services

RTC Medical Solutions Ltd offers CQC Registered Ambulance Services nationwide.

Did you know that only a CQC registered ambulance provider can legally provide both Blue Light Ambulances and Healthcare Professionals (such as Paramedics and Nurses) to events in England?

Providers offering these services who are not registered with the CQC could be using loopholes to avoid registering.

Don’t take the risk, after all the book stops with you as the event planner!

Why not book your event with the professionals.

Our Healthcare Professional and Heath & Safety Management team ensure the adequate level of medical staff at your event. Following discussions with the Health and Safety Executive, event planners are responsible for both adequate and appropriate levels of medical cover at any event they manage.

Let us take the stress away… we will work along side the Ambulance Service, SAG and provide adequate cover with guidance from the Purple Guide to ensure visitors to your event receive the best possible care.

Whether your event is a small fete or concert or major music festival we can help.

Contact us now for more information on the services we can offer.

Click here for our online contact form.

01782 776110